Upcoming Course Offerings

UPCOMING COURSE OFFERINGS

Delve into the politics, histories, cultures, and people of Latin America in our courses.

Spring 2024

Gen Ed: Tier 1 Individuals & Societies - Gen Ed: Exploring Perspectives, Social Scientist

Mexico today is a diverse and dynamic country that is often misrepresented in popular stereotypes as a country full of sleepy, rural villages or dangerous, drug-ridden deserts. What are the major challenges facing Mexico today? Why do so many people migrate away from Mexico-and why do even more Mexicans return home?  What historical and contemporary forces have shaped contemporary Mexico? We will learn about major topics including immigration, racial and ethnic diversity, democracy and political change, inequality, environmental change, violence, injustice and impunity, and Mexico in the global context (especially Mexico-United States relations). In the process, you will gain a far better understanding than most North Americans have of the peoples, environments, cultures and regions of Mexico, and of the complex political, economic and social structures that influence the region and its international relations, especially with the United States. This course focuses on current challenges of development, environment, and politics in Mexico. It will examine how Mexico has dealt with such issues as economic development and human rights. We will also explore environmental and indigenous politics, resource struggles, urban challenges, and the impact of the war on drugs. The last part of the class examines Mexican migration experiences, U.S. immigration policy, and the social and environmental context of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Students are encouraged to follow the news about Mexico to keep up with rapidly-changing events and ideas. Some of the topics we cover are controversial (e.g., revolutions, immigration, drugs and U.S. intervention) and you may not always agree with the opinions expressed by the readings, professors, teaching assistants, or your fellow students.  We encourage you to express your ideas and to question the ideas presented to you, in a constructive manner that shows respect for the views of others.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates Days Times Instructor
MAIN Regular 1 Lecture In Person 1/10 - 5/1

Mo Wed Fr

11:00 AM - 11:50 AM Shelby Smith
CMNTY Regular 501 Lecture In Person 1/10 - 5/1 Mo Wed Fr 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM Shelby Smith

Freshman Colloquia

An introduction to the complexities of the local border reality and prepares students to better appreciate the challenges and opportunities facing the region from a variety of perspectives. Though not exclusive, areas of concern include business, trade, health care, education, environment, tourism, migration and security. An interdisciplinary approach to the transnational dynamics of the borderlands provides wide appeal across programs and majors. Guest speakers representing the different border region constituencies will complement the class lectures and discussions. Participation in this colloquium prepares the student for an optional field trip course (LAS 395a) to the border region and/or into the neighboring state of Sonora taking place over several weekends during the fall semester. Students will be evaluated on the basis of attendance and participation, a short reflection paper (3 - 4 pages), and a final oral presentation. Students taking the course for Honors credit will be assigned special readings and /or attend special related lectures to report on during class sessions and receive honors grading.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates Days Times Instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Colloquium In Person 1/10 - 5/1 Wed 12:00 PM-12:50 PM Colin Deeds

Cross Listed with History - Engagement: Intercultural Exploration - Engagement: Diversity and Identity

This course focuses on the social, cultural, linguistic, and historical roots of contemporary Central American identities.  As the introductory course in Central American Studies Certificate offered through the Center for Latin American Studies, this course takes an interdisciplinary look at the evolution and development of Central American peoples and nations, with particular emphasis on the indigenous foundations of the region. We begin by situating Central America in broad Latin American historical contexts with examinations of colonialism, nation-building, and the modern political economies of the region. We then turn to topical examinations of indigenous identity, culture, and languages. Through individual and collective research and analysis, students will examine the following themes of this course: colonization and imperialism; indigenous identity and culture; race and mestizaje; migration and human rights; and indigenous movements of Central America.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates Days Times Instructor
MAIN 7W2 101 Lecture Fully Online 3/11 - 5/1 - - Elizabeth Oglesby
ONLN 7W2 201 Lecture Fully Online 3/11 - 5/1 - - Elizabeth Oglesby
ONLN 7W2 201 Lecture Fully Online 3/11 - 5/1 - - Elizabeth Oglesby
MAIN 7W2 101 Lecture Fully Online 3/11 - 5/1 - - Elizabeth Oglesby

Cross Listed with Anthropology and Political Science

With a focus on Latin America, this course examines the historical, comparative, and current dynamics of two global commodities: illicit drugs and oil. These commodities--which depend on a U.S. consumer base--generate unfathomable wealth and unrelenting violence at local, national, and international levels. We follow them from extraction and production through consumption, examining socioeconomic and environmental impacts, their relationship to state corruption, and possible strategies for responding to the problems they create.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates Days Times Instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Lecture In Person 1/10 - 5/1 Tr 12:30 PM - 01:45 PM Katie O'Brien
MAIN Regular 001 Lecture In Person 1/10 - 5/1 Tr 12:30 PM - 01:45 PM Katie O'Brien
MAIN Regular 001 Lecture In Person 1/10 - 5/1 Tr 12:30 PM - 01:45 PM Katie O'Brien
MAIN Regular 001 Lecture In Person 1/10 - 5/1 Tr 12:30 PM - 01:45 PM Katie O'Brien

This course will focus on the specific characteristics of the current conflict by learning about President Felipe Calderón's approach to combating organized crime, the involvement of the ATF and DEA in Mexico, and the important Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs), such as the Sinaloa Cartel, Los Zetas, The Gulf Cartel and their leaders Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán, "El Lazca", Osiel Cardenas, Miguel Felix Gallardo, the Beltran Leyva brothers to name a few. We will also discuss the Peace Movement in Mexico and the work that is being done to change the course of the conflict. As the semester advances we will discuss more broadly the social issues imbedded in this conflict and provide opportunities for students to arrive at complex understandings of the role of drugs and violence in contemporary society.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates Days Times Instructor
MAIN 7W2 001 Lecture Fully Online 3/11 - 5/1 - - Katie O'Brien

Mexico has one of the world's most accomplished food heritages. Many people in the U.S. are unaware that in ancient times the country's native peoples domesticated many important food crops that are of great importance today: corn, tomato, avocado, squash, pinto beans, and cacao (chocolate), to name a few. As in other countries, Mexican food is not an incidental component of life, but an essential part of how Mexico is structured; what people eat represents a confluence of power, culture, technology, and taste. In this course, we take a critical look at Mexican food production, processing, and consumption through a political ecology approach that includes an examination of important historical developments that provide context to more contemporary processes. These include Mexico's Green Revolution; the impact of globalization and new conceptualizations of food; the North American Free Trade Agreement; and migration in and out of Mexico. 

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates Days Times Instructor
MAIN 7W2 001 Lecture Fully Online 3/11 - 5/1 - - Oliver Froehling

Engagement Activity To Be Determined - Engagement Competency To Be Determined

A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies. Senior standing required.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates Days Times Instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Seminar

In Person

1/10 - 5/1 Wed Fr 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM TBA

Cross Listed with Anthropology - Co-convened 

This course examines the social study of human health both within and beyond the borders of Latin America. In addition to the violent processes of human migration, we will explore how other border-crossings of pathogens, chemicals, climates, economies, medicine, and morality move across borders and how and why they become critical to assessing key dilemmas of `global Latin American health today. How do borders, of landmasses, nation states, and even the body itself, shape human health through the boundaries they structure? On the other hand, how is interdisciplinary research on health contending with the breakdown of borders at various scales of human existence? To answer these questions, students will read historical and contemporary texts to grapple with the complex conditions that constitute health, suffering, and disease in Latin America and beyond.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates Days Times Instructor
MAIN 7W2 001 Lecture Fully Online 1/10 - 5/1 Th 3:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Stefanie Graeter

MAIN 7W2 001 Lecture Fully Online 1/10 - 5/1 Th 3:30 PM - 6:00 PM Stefanie Graeter
MAIN 7W2 001 Lecture Fully Online 1/10 - 5/1 Th 3:30 PM - 6:00 PM Stefanie Graeter
MAIN 7W2 001 Lecture Fully Online 1/10 - 5/1 Th 3:30 PM - 6:00 PM Stefanie Graeter
 

Co-convened 

In this course, we will explore the consequences of digital media on elections and democracy in Latin America. Taking the Brazilian context as a starting point, we will examine how the crisis of democracy in the region relates to changes in media systems and advances in media technology. Some topics to debate include the transition of media systems to postmodern or hybrid configurations, new political representation and participation dynamics, fake news, segmented political communication, and the radicalization of politics. Through the analysis of a range of Latin American case studies (e.g. Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, El Salvador, and Venezuela), students will evaluate how digital media impact elections and democracy from a regional comparative perspective.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates Days Times Instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Lecture In Person 1/10 - 5/1 Tu 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM TBA
MAIN Regular 001 Lecture In Person 1/10 - 5/1 Tu 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM TBA
 

In this course, we will explore race and resistance across the Americas. Taking the Brazilian situation as a springboard, this class will critically analyze notions of race, racism, and anti-racism. Students will have the opportunity to work on projects that explore racial ideology, structural/institutional racism, and anti-racist resistance across the Americas. Through a social science lens, students will select, examine, and share examples of racial injustice in a particular country, paying attention to how race has been a determining factor in discrimination, exclusion, and resistance. Course materials are organized around critical discussions of the deeply seated racial inequality and discrimination that impact all aspects of economic and social life, as well as the ways in which different forms of mobilization confront racism.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates Days Times Instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Lecture In Person 1/10 - 5/1  We 3:00 PM - 5:30 PM Antonio José Bacelar da Silva

The exchange of scholarly information and/or research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may be required of course registrants.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates Days Times Instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Colloquium In Person 1/10 - 5/1  Fr 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Marcela Vásquez-León
MAIN Regular 001 Colloquium In Person 1/10 - 5/1  Fr 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Marcela Vásquez-León

GIDP: Applied Intercultural Arts Research (AIAR) - GIDP: Global Change (GC)

This course provides a hands-on introduction to the use of qualitative research methods.  We will examine data collection and data analysis techniques that are employed in qualitative research.  Data collection methods will include: informal and semi-structured interviewing, direct observation, free lists, and focus groups.  We will also cover the management and analysis of these data.  Throughout the course, students will be asked to consider the advantages and disadvantages associated with each method and to consider alternate methods of data collection and analysis. The format is varied and will include lectures, discussion, group work, class presentations, and practical experience with the methods.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates Days Times Instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Lecture In Person 1/10 - 5/1  Mo 3:00 PM - 5:30 PM Antonio José Bacelar da Silva

Summer 2023

Cross Listed with Africana Studies, Anthropology, Portuguese, Spanish

How are race and racism perceived and experienced in countries in Latin America particularly such as Brazil, Venezuela and Colombia where a mixed-race ideology and the myth of racial equality have traditionally been at the core of national identity? This class critically analyzes notions of race and anti-racist activism to examine the ideologies and circumstances of the political structure, race-targeted public policies, and black activism in contemporary Latin America.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN 5W1 101 Lecture Fully Online 6/5 - 7/6 - - Antonio Bacelar Da Silva
ONLINE 5W1 201 Lecture Fully Online 6/5 - 7/6 - - Antonio Bacelar Da Silva

Cross Listed with Anthropology and Political Science

With a focus on Latin America, this course examines the historical, comparative, and current dynamics of two global commodities: illicit drugs and oil. These commodities--which depend on a U.S. consumer base--generate unfathomable wealth and unrelenting violence at local, national, and international levels. We follow them from extraction and production through consumption, examining socioeconomic and environmental impacts, their relationship to state corruption, and possible strategies for responding to the problems they create.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN 5W1 101 Lecture Fully Online 6/5 - 7/6 - - Susan Brewer-Osorio
DIST 5W1 150 Lecture Fully Online 6/5 - 7/6 - - Susan Brewer-Osorio
ONLINE 5W1 201 Lecture Fully Online 6/5 - 7/6 - - Susan Brewer-Osorio
 

The course will focus on the specific characteristics of the current conflict by learning about President Felipe Calderón's approach to combating organized crime, the involvement of the ATF and DEA in Mexico, and the important Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs), such as the Sinaloa Cartel, Los Zetas, The Gulf Cartel and their leaders Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán, "El Lazca", Osiel Cardenas, Miguel Felix Gallardo, the Beltran Leyva brothers to name a few. We will also discuss the Peace Movement in Mexico and the work that is being done to change the course of the conflict. As the semester advances we will discuss more broadly the social issues embedded in this conflict and provide opportunities for students to arrive at complex understandings of the role of drugs and violence in contemporary society.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN 5W2 101 Lecture Fully Online 7/10 - 8/9 - - Colin Deeds
ONLINE 5W2 201 Lecture Fully Online 7/10 - 8/9 - - Colin Deeds
 

Cross Listed with Political Science

This course offers a general introduction to contemporary Latin America from the perspective of political economy. It will focus on structural factors to help explain the main political, social, and economic trends in the region. The overall goal of the course is to provide the basic, historical tools for understanding the current challenges that this region confronts.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN 5W2 101 Lecture Fully Online 7/10 - 8/9 - - Katie O'Brien
ONLINE 5W2 201 Lecture Fully Online 7/10 - 8/9 - - Katie O'Brien

Fall 2023

Gen Ed:Tier 1 Individuals & Societies - Exploring Perspectives, Social Scientist

In this course, students will apply a social science perspective to the study of Latin America as a complex region. This course will examine the historical, political, economic, and social factors contributing to racism, inequality, and violence in Latin America, as well as how Latin Americans have fought for social justice and waged social revolutions to challenge systems of oppression. This course emphasizes the experiences, struggles, and contributions of marginalized populations such as women, Black and Indigenous people, economically disadvantaged, and members of LGBTQIA+ communities. Using the analytical tools and qualitative methods of social scientists, students in this course will analyze how specific case studies exemplify broader regional trends; identify the historical antecedents of current events; and propose solutions to pressing global problems. Along the way, students will reflect on their own stereotypes about Latin American countries and peoples and come to a greater understanding of the importance of learning about this dynamic region of the world.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN Dynamically Dated Session 001 Lecture Hybrid 9/25 - 12/6 Mo We 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM Kathleen O'Brien
MAIN Dynamically Dated Session 001A Discussion Hybrid 9/25 - 12/6 Fr 9:00 AM - 9:50 AM Kathleen O'Brien
MAIN Dynamically Dated Session 001B Discussion Hybrid 9/25 - 12/6 Fr 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM Kathleen O'Brien
MAIN Dynamically Dated Session 002 Lecture Hybrid 9/25 - 12/6 Mo We 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM Kathleen O'Brien
MAIN Dynamically Dated Session 002A Discussion Hybrid 9/25 - 12/6 Fr 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM Kathleen O'Brien
 

Gen Ed: Tier 2 Individuals and Societies - Exploring Perspectives, Social Scientist

Food is of wide-ranging interest because it makes up a significant part of the cultures that bind people together into national communities. Food is central to cross-cultural studies of behavior, thought, and symbolism. This course explores the connections between what people in Latin America eat and who they are through cross-cultural study of Latin Americans' food production, preparation, and consumption. Readings are organized around critical discussions of what people cook and eat in Mexico, Tucson-Mexico Border, Caribbean, Central America, Colombia, Venezuela, Brazil, Peru, and Argentina. A primary goal of the course is to provide students with theoretical and empirical tools to understand and evaluate the relationship between food, history, culture, and economy in Latin America at local and global levels.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN 7W2 101 Lecture Fully Online 10/1 - 12/6 - - Katie O'Brien
ONLINE 7W2 201 Lecture Fully Online 10/1 - 12/6 - - Katie O'Brien

Cross Listed with Political Science and Public Administration - Gen Ed: Tier 2 Individuals and Societies - Gen Ed: Exploring Perspectives, Social Scientist

How does power shape international relations? In this course, students will apply a social science perspective to the study of U.S.-Latin American relations. The course is organized around the concept of power, and how asymmetric power relations between the United States and Latin American countries contribute to inequality and in justice between states (global) and within societies (social). In this course, students identify and explore social science approaches to the global power structure and use theory to analyze five hemispheric challenges: unequal economic development, cross border displacement, insecurity, climate change, and global health inequalities. In addition, students explore how a social scientist's position in the global power structure shapes their perspective through a comparison of the main U.S. approach(realism) and the main Latin American approach(dependency). Students use the analytical tools and methods of social science to identify how U.S. imperialism shapes the five hemispheric challenges, and to connect imperialism to structural injustice at the international level. Finally, throughout the course, students reflect on their position in the global power structure and how they can contribute solutions to hemispheric problems.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Lecture In Person 8/21 - 12/6 Tu Th 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM Susan Brewer-Osorio

The course will focus on the specific characteristics of the current conflict by learning about President Felipe Calderón's approach to combating organized crime, the involvement of the ATF and DEA in Mexico, and the important Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs), such as the Sinaloa Cartel, Los Zetas, The Gulf Cartel and their leaders Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán, "El Lazca", Osiel Cardenas, Miguel Felix Gallardo, the Beltran Leyva brothers to name a few. We will also discuss the Peace Movement in Mexico and the work that is being done to change the course of the conflict. As the semester advances we will discuss more broadly the social issues imbedded in this conflict and provide opportunities for students to arrive at complex understandings of the role of drugs and violence in contemporary society.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Lecture In Person 8/21 - 12/6 Tu Th 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM Colin Deeds

Cross Listed with Geography

The American immigration and border enforcement systems have undergone radical changes in the last several decades and have become flashpoints of controversy across the political spectrum. Using a human rights frame, this class will take a critical look at the development of these policies and the ways in which they have impacted immigrants and their families. Using the latest scholarship and recent in-depth journalism, we will explore the component policies of these complicated systems, their dramatic consequences for undocumented and documented people alike, and possible avenues for change within a human rights framework.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Lecture In Person 8/21 - 12/6 Mo We Fr 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM Shelby Smith

Cross Listed with Political Science

This course offers a general introduction to contemporary Latin America from the perspective of political economy. It will focus on structural factors to help explain the main political, social and economic trends in the region. The overall goal of the course is to provide the basic, historical tools for understanding the current challenges that this region confronts.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN 7W1 101 Lecture Fully Online 8/21 - 10/1 - - Mario Alberto Macias
ONLINE 7W1 201 Lecture Fully Online 8/21 - 10/1 - - Mario Alberto Macias
 

460: Cross Listed with Gender & Women's Studies - 56O: GIDP: Applied Intercultural Arts Research (AIAR) - Co-convened

This course explores the relationship between film and feminism in Latin America. What can films teach us about gender and its intersection with class, race, sexuality, politics, and place in Latin America? How do Latin American women filmmakers express unique points of view on gender relations in society, thus contributing to the production of feminisms? What makes a film feminist? What are the experiences of women filmmakers in an industry dominated by men? We will critically evaluate films from a feminist and film studies perspective. We will contextualize films in the historical context of Latin American societies and cinema, with a particular emphasis on films directed by women in Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, Guatemala, Cuba, and Peru. We will screen films across various genres to explore the following themes: revolution; dictatorships; Black, indigenous, and decolonial feminisms; motherhood; gendered violence; reproductive rights; and sexuality.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Lecture In Person 8/21 - 12/6 Tu Th 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM Katie O'Brien
 

595: GIDP: Applied Intercultural Arts Research (AIAR) - Co-convened

The exchange of scholarly information and/or research, usually in a small group setting.  Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons.  Research projects may be required of course registrants.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Colloquium In Person 8/21 - 12/6 Fr 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Katrina Dillon

Interdisciplinary introduction to graduate work and research in Latin American Studies.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Lecture In Person 8/21 - 12/6 Mo 3:00 PM - 5:30 PM Elizabeth Oglesby

Cross Listed with Anthropology

This course examines how environmental, social, cultural, and political factors in Latin America intersect with processes of globalization to impact conflict over scarce natural resources and socioeconomic uncertainty.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Seminar In Person 8/21 - 12/6 Th 4:30 PM - 7:00 PM Marcela Vásquez-León

Cross Listed with Anthropology

The Caribbean along with other Spanish and Portuguese territories have been heavily influenced by the English, Dutch and French. This course looks at the settlement of the Caribbean with reference to those processes which frame contemporary society and public issues.

Campus Session Section Component Mode Dates days times instructor
MAIN Regular 001 Seminar In Person 8/21 - 12/6 Tu 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM Richard Stoffle